Saturday, April 2, 2011

Krause was early builder


Sent to The Frederick Leader and The Frederick Press
April 28, 2009
 
Krause built much of early Frederick
A.H. Krause built Frederick.
Literally.
Krause was a contractor and builder who, between the years 1902 and 1940, constructed more of Frederick’s buildings than any other person. Although some of those buildings are now gone, many remain. We see and use his buildings every day.
Krause built early homes, churches, and other public buildings including most of downtown Frederick. He also constructed downtown buildings in most area communities.
Albert Herman Krause was born in Illinois in 1875 and was married to Alice Louise Burger Krause on December 24, 1899, in Winfield, Kansas. Krause was 24. The bride had just turned 16.
Sue Kaufman examines 1899 Krause wedding dress at Frederick museum.
The Krauses’ clothes from that 1899 wedding are on display today at Frederick’s Pioneer Townsite Museum. The bridal dress, a “waist” and jacket, were part of the bridal trousseau and were made by Alice and her mother.
A Prince Albert coat worn by Krause at the 1899 wedding hangs alongside the dress in an old-fashioned chifforobe in the museum’s farmhouse.
The Krause family donated the clothes to the museum in 1989.
Following their marriage the Krauses moved to Blackwell, Oklahoma, where their first child, a girl named Evangaline, was born on February 3, 1902. The baby lived only 12 hours. A baby jacket made for Evangaline but never worn is displayed at the museum along with the Krauses’ wedding clothes.
What brought the young couple to the new town of Frederick?
In 1902 Krause’s father, Herman Agusta Krause, moved to the Manitou area. A.H. and Alice came with him to build his home, a stable, chicken house, granary, and carriage house.
When the elder Krause’s farm buildings were completed, a neighbor named Schofield asked the young Krause to build a house for him. After that, a banker suggested to A.H. that he should stay in Frederick because it was a growing town.
The Krauses did stay, and between 1902 and 1940 A.H. Krause built a major part of the Frederick.
The couple had three sons ­– Albert Roy, Frederick Louis, and Max Ellous.
Krause’s office and construction plant were located at 200-208 South 7th Street.
A 1919 city directory advertised his business as follows: “Albert H. Krause, general contractor and builder, dealer in building materials, sand, stone, lumber and paints, manufacturer of sashes, doors and all kinds of mill work”. The business employed numerous carpenters and other tradesmen.
The Krause residence was listed in the 1919 directory as 1015 N. 15th at city limits.
A business ad from 1920 not only lists some of the businesses that Krause constructed, but also shows some of the locations on a rough map of the downtown area. The ad says, “Over 80 per cent of the business blocks in Frederick are my designs and contracts.”
Krause-constructed businesses listed in the 1920 ad are as follows: City Hall (126 South Tenth), Kelly Hotel, (300 West Grand), First National Bank (200 West Grand),  Oklahoma State Bank, (10th and Grand), Leader block (304 West Grand), Wallace-Frazier (?), William Cameron Lumber Company (309-315 West Grand), Frederick Hardware Company (222 West Grand), Baptist church (201 East Grand. This church later burned and was replaced with the current First Baptist Church building), entire block on Tenth, Opera House (South Tenth), Library (200 East Grand), Community auditorium (large wooden building at 200 South 12th, site of current Central Grade School building), Red Front Drug Store (122 West Grand).
The 1920 ad also stated that Krause was builder of homes for sale.
The Krauses remained in Frederick until about 1940 when they moved to California.
A.H. Krause died in Hawthorne, California, in October 1942 at age 67. Alice Krause lived to the age of 101. She died in 1985 in San Fernando, California.
Joe Wynn is a member of the Tillman County Historical Society's board of directors. He can be contacted by e-mail at jawynn@cableone.net.

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